Shine Cycle Character Profile: Eliezer

This is the next in the series of profiles of characters who will appear in the Shine Cycle, my fantasy-series-in-preparation.

Eliezer is a native-born knight of the Shine and Wild Empire. As soon as he can get over his tendencies toward “textbook generalship,” he will perhaps be the best native-born general in the Empire—a military genius. However, that will probably take a while, since he usually achieves success even with textbook techniques. Continue reading

Advertisements

Shine Cycle Character Profile: Vincent

This is the next in the series of profiles of characters who will appear in the Shine Cycle, my fantasy-series-in-preparation.

Vincent – Knight, Visiting Scholar, and bard. A brilliant strategist and tactician, knighted on the field in the war that began days after he arrived. Since he saw several of the previous generation of strategists at work and patterned his own designs after them, he maintained that he did not deserve the honor and studied under various knights-master. Continue reading

Strategic Primer: Distinctive: Competent subordinates

There are several features that distinguish my strategy game, Strategic Primer from other strategy games I know of, even those that influence it. One example is that in Strategic Primer, the player has competent subordinates.

Every strategy game I know of (except perhaps AI War, which I haven’t played enough to become the slightest bit competent) presents only a single level of subordinates to the player. For instance, each campaign in real-time strategy game Galactic Battlegrounds (a Star Wars themed Age of Empires) has the main character rising from a low-level commander to something approaching commander in chief, but all through the game the units are the same, just with some not available yet at the beginning, and from beginning to end the player has to micromanage every single unit.

In games with advisors, such as SimCity and the recently-released Sid Meier’s Civilization V, each advisor advocates his or her own pet project or agenda without any regard for the facts. (In SimCity 2000, for instance, the transportation advisor screams at you if you reduce transportation funding by even 10%, even if other critical priorities are running at less than half their requested budgets and the city is bankrupt.) The closest thing to a sensible advisor I’ve seen is Sid Meier’s recommendations in Civilization IV, but even that is rarely in touch with the real state of affairs.

Not so in Strategic Primer. Continue reading