“That first Christmas evening”

I wish a merry Christmas and blessed Christmas season to all my readers.

It is common, in some circles in which I move, to say that Jesus was born “that first Christmas morning” or even “that first Christmas morn.” But I, being curious and something of a quibbler by nature, have at times wondered: what time of day was the Christ Child born? Is the idea that he was born in the morning “possible, but in this life we’ll never know,” like the popular notion that there were exactly three Magi (or in fact that he was born on what is now December 25), or “unlikely,” like Rossetti’s charming, picturesque, theologically on-point, but in-details-dubious poem “In the Bleak Midwinter”? Continue reading

Advertisements

“Heralds’ Rejoicing”

Painting of the angel seated on the stone

The Christ has risen; heaven’s hosts rejoice.
They who proclaimed his birth in human flesh
Had stood, these days, in battle-readiness
Lest he who made them should have need of them,
But he has won this victory alone.
All that remains for angel heralds bright
Is to announce this joyful news: Rejoice!

I wrote this poem this week to mark Eastertide. I had intended to make it longer and talk about each of the characters in the Gospel accounts in turn, as I did in last year’s poem, but in the end I didn’t think I could write more than this one stanza and still post it today.

As always, I earnestly welcome your comments, suggestions, questions, critique, or other feedback about this or any other part of my work. (In other words, if you liked this poem, or you didn’t like it, or it made you think of something, or … please leave a comment to let me know.) If you liked this, you can follow this blog, which includes one of my poems every Friday, or read other poems I’ve written here on my blog (starting with those linked from one of the “archive ” installments, since the full archive is by now, at well over a hundred poems, somewhat daunting); I’d especially like to know, as part of my preparations for a collection, which poems you think are my best. You may also share it with others, subject to my sharing policy.

This poem is also archived on my wiki.